Fun Fact: Before I decided to study Political Science and pursue a career in journalism, I wanted to study theatre. Now, most of my enjoyment for the stage comes from photographing rehearsals and performances.

Show coverage allows photographers to play with angles and utilize the lighting of the production. The faces of actors portray incredibly expressive emotions, while the movement of dancers make for amazing photos. Generally, I’m allowed to freely roam the auditorium, and sometimes, I’ve been allowed to take photos from the catwalks (make sure to always ask permission from the director and stage manager*).

Beyond the rehearsals and productions, backstage photos allow for a greater variety of content, as well as a look into what audience members wouldn’t normally be able to see. This makes photo galleries more interesting to viewers.

*Always make sure to contact directors and managers before photographing rehearsals or performances. Sometimes, they’ll give you access to different parts of the stage and house; other times, they’ll ask you to stay in one spot. Contacting directors and managers also serves a courtesy to them, as they’ll be reminded of your arrival and prepare the cast and crew.

Sophomores Jacob Clay and Sammie Zimay rehearse for “Are You Ready?” Tuesday, February 18 in Studio Theatre. Utilizing a “freeze frame” technique, each actors offers a different perspective to one unusual interaction in a high-class restaurant. The short play is written by David Auburn and directed by sophomore Michelle Secunda. (Canon Rebel T3i/18- 55mm)

Sophomores Jacob Clay and Sammie Zimay rehearse for “Are You Ready?” Tuesday, February 18 in Studio Theatre. Utilizing a “freeze frame” technique, each actors offers a different perspective to one unusual interaction in a high-class restaurant. The short play is written by David Auburn and directed by sophomore Michelle Secunda. (Canon Rebel T3i/18- 55mm)

Freshman Tristan Yi comforts distraught junior Emily Passarelli during a rehearsal for “Maple and Vine” Tuesday, May 6 in Harbach Theatre. The play focuses on the idea of escapism through time, as the pair moves to a community that seeks to recreate the mid-1950s. “Maple and Vine” is written by Samuel French and directed by Professor of Theatre Neil Blackadder. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)

Freshman Tristan Yi comforts distraught junior Emily Passarelli during a rehearsal for “Maple and Vine” Tuesday, May 6 in Harbach Theatre. The play focuses on the idea of escapism through time, as the pair moves to a community that seeks to recreate the mid-1950s. “Maple and Vine” is written by Samuel French and directed by Professor of Theatre Neil Blackadder. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)

Covered in paint and adorned in grass skirts or beige pants, members of the Terpsichore Dance Collective are joined by fellow dancers and collaborators at the end of their Spring show “Enigma”. Together, they danced to remixed songs from “The Lion King”. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)

Covered in paint and adorned in grass skirts or beige pants, members of the Terpsichore Dance Collective are joined by fellow dancers and collaborators at the end of their Spring show “Enigma”. Together, they danced to remixed songs from “The Lion King”. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)

Freshman Maya Klem ends the “Enigma” Terpsichore Spring performance with a dance to remixed songs from “The Lion King”. The last dance features each of the night’s performing groups, as tradition for Terpsichore shows. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)

Freshman Maya Klem ends the “Enigma” Terpsichore Spring performance with a dance to remixed songs from “The Lion King”. The last dance features each of the night’s performing groups, as tradition for Terpsichore shows. (Canon Rebel T3i/18-55mm)